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Your bridge is securely cemented onto a pair abutments formed from the two closest teeth to the tooth that was lost. Even though the cement is intended to anchor the bridge securely, there are a few rare instances that can cause one or both ends to come loose.

A significant blow to the face or a hard fall can compromise one or both abutments or the cement holding them to the bridge. At the same time, problems with chronic periodontal disease can give bacteria access to the seam where your bridge meets the abutments. In time the bacteria could start to weaken the cement holding one or both ends of the bridge in place.

If any part of your bridge feels loose, you need to call Alan L. Nix DDS immediately, to schedule an appointment.

Try to avoid wiggling, cleaning, or playing with the loosened bridge. Even a small amount of motion could damage the structural integrity of an abutment. If you have blood or debris in your mouth you can rinse it away with lukewarm salt water. Any other attempts at cleaning should be reserved for the highly trained dental professionals at Alan L. Nix DDS.

If bacteria at the gum line has caused a minor failure in the cement or compromised, it’s attachment to one of the abutments, your dentist might be able to cement it back in place. If one or both of the abutments have been damaged, it might require a root canal.

If one of both ends of your bridge feels loose, or even wiggles abnormally, you need to call Alan L. Nix DDS as soon as possible, at 972-563-7633 to schedule an appointment.