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There is a health emergency going on in the United States. We have become a nation of obese diabetics. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) reports that there are more than 29 million people in America that have diabetes, and another 86 million that suffer from prediabetes—meaning that they have above average levels of blood glucose and are well on their way to developing full-blown diabetes

The connection between diabetes and your dental health is gum disease, otherwise known as periodontitis. The concern is that as a diabetic, you have two problems that feed off each other: 1) You have an immune deficiency that makes it harder to fight off germs and infection, and 2) Your high blood sugar levels increase the amount of bacteria in the mouth which cause decay and infection to flourish.

This double whammy makes it easy for gum disease to take hold, so diabetics are at much greater risk of periodontitis and tooth loss. The process begins when your gum tissue pulls back from the teeth. It becomes serious when pockets form between the teeth and gum allowing bacteria to hide and infection to grow and spread. Eventually, the bone and tissues that anchor your teeth in place is destroyed.

To avoid this unhappy circumstance, watch for warning signs. If your gums bleed frequently, become red and inflamed, or your teeth look longer because of receding gumlines, come see us immediately for evaluation.

To make an appointment, call Dr. Alan Nix and our helpful team at Alan L. Nix DDS. Phone: 972-563-7633, or come by our office in Terrell, Texas.